Health and Environment:  This is a terrible morning.  Not because I have another week to go before my endodontic/walletectomy consultant can fix my bothersome tooth.  And, no, not because is snowed on a good part of the Northeast delivering the White Christmas. (Tho’ a nice touch…)

What makes it terrible is that it’s a short enough work-week to verge on uselessness.  Sure, the stock market will be open “regular hours” but the bond traders get to be the Long Island Expressway rush Friday by blowing out at 2 PM.  But, mainly thre week’s a drag because everyone’s “head” will be anywhere but “in the game.

In other words, for people in semi-routine jobs (planning, software, accounting, and that sort of thing), this will likely be the week with the highest error rates of the year and lowest quality output.  For a number of reasons…

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For one, people will be talking way too much.  I don’t mind a bit of social chit-chat, but from my time in the “cube farm” regions, often, the worst aspect of the job wasn’t the actual labor:  It was listening to boring, unwanted, time-wasting blatherspeak from people who just “have to share.

Gush not, bore not.

After-Christmas Grinchly of me?  Yeah, maybe.  But Ure’s truly is deadly-serious when working.  I am a work hard, play hard, study hard, focus, focus, focus type.  Even on Christmas morning, my to-do list and it had sixteen items on it. Of those, BTW, getting the turkey loaded for the bake was #12. I thought about putting “Relax” in as item #17 but thought it a bit OCD.

Sure, if you work at a job where “the score” doesn’t result in any change to your paycheck, chat away.  But in sales (my forte) there was (and is) ALWAYS something to do that can bump-up your batting average – and that batting average is directly related to income.

I could go on about time-wasters at work (and how everyone’s compensation should be tied to business success) but I’d be preaching to an empty church.  Especially today.

Second main reason this week’s a waste has to do with late arrivals, early departures, and ridiculously long lunches.  In many companies, what is nominally an 8 hour work day turns into a couple of hours at best.

Third?  Well, let’s just say my list goes on for quite a ways, but I don’t to break your holiday cheer, if I haven’t already.

Instead, I offer a modest proposal:

THE NATIONAL VACATION WEEKS

Idea’s simple enough:  Since no one really works (except fire, police, medical, military, and such) why not just close down the whole country for 9-days at the end of the year?

I mean EVERYTHING.

No mail.  (Means no bills will arrive)

No Banking.  (Means no hold-ups and ATM’s will run out, which would remind people that there is only a fairytale appearance of unlimited plenty in the world without people actually working. Works gets a terrible bad-rap from the lazy and the young…if you can distinguish.)

No regular work: (Means there will be HUGE savings on gasoline and diesel and the roads will be vacant for all but recreational travelers.  Could infrastructure last 4% longer?

Sure,, there will be problems with it:  But what’s the point of Making America Great Again if all we get is another 2,200 hour work-year and a few crumbs for the effort?

I have a sneaking suspicion that like the mythical Social Security increases (all but $10-bucks of which was eating up by Medicare going up for us), when comes down to it, time-off is a lot more useful to people than an office party.

I mean, if we want to talk entitlements, this is something the LLL (lousy liberal left) ought to throw its arms around.  Why, two 9-day National Vacations a year (one over the week of the 4th of July, the other between Christmas and New Years) would give all those down-trodden working poor, a chance to claim one of the real prizes in Life. Time off.

On the other hand, the RRR (repugnant repulsive right) could go for the idea, too…since it would end all the vacation discussions in comp packages and would let RRR’s claim it’s all thanks to their party. In other words, if the idea takes off, both parties will claim credit, and if it doesn’t work?  The other party is to blame.  It’s a winning political football.

I know you have many “happy returns” to get out of the way over lunch, or when you do the 4 o’clock slide today, so we’re tightly focused.

Think about it: National Holidays: Each  9 days in length, twice a year.  18-days of people time.

America is almost 250-years old. Isn’t it about time we start acting like dignified adults?  And take more time off?

Holiday Communication Overhead

If you were thinking of calling us to tell me how your holiday went, here’s my thought-process  so you’re warned in advance:

If you had a great time, I will ask you: “So, why weren’t we invited?”

And if you had a crappy time, I’ll ask  “Why are you telling me this?  I wasn’t there…so why does it matter?

Hope Elaine answers, not me.

I believe ALL communications overhead by 2/3rd’s by applying “Ure’s Law of Direct Communications.”

This law says “Only deal with the person you’re dealing with – NOT THIRD PARTIES.”  Jeez, that’d be the end of FB, wouldn’t it?  Ibid tweets.

Under Ure’s Law, you could call and say “I had a very nice Christmas and I appreciate the check you sent…”

But,, my patience ends with conversations that go…  “I had a very nice Christmas except my (brother, sister, mother, father, uncle, aunt so-and-so, and Trump and….whozzit… did this…and THEY (someone else on the list) did that and...Did I tell you about so & so? OMG they….”  (See all the excess verbiage?  Verbiage is time.  Time is money.  You can figure it from there.)

A lawyer would third-party references hearsay?  Circle back to “If it mattered, you’d invite us…OR.  If I wasn’t there, does it matter?  Doubly- especially if I have direct contact with the mentioned people being reported on?”

My life is complicated enough dealing with people one-on-one.  Spare me third-party damage reports…Let’s you and me focus on the two key people in our conversations and emails:

You and me.

Write when you get rich,

George@ure.net

The End of Santa's Rally
Coping: With the Holiday