Prepper Deluxe: Time to Get a "Cache Property?"

Like so many kids today, mine have not been family-forming or buying property.  But there’s a set of events a few years out on the horizon that make at least some absolutely minimal fall-back position from Big Cities something to seriously consider.

Yeah, yeah…”Ain’t got money, Dad…” is the usual answer.  So this morning, in preparation for my son coming down here to visit, a preview of the stern lecture that Dad will be issuing, complete with timing of the real estate cycles and so forth, that are involved.

At some point, today’s kids are going to wake up and realize they have been “had” by the Nanny State.  And when the sociopolitical upheaval, accompanied by wholesale mass unemployment greater than even the 1930’s shows up, a Minimal Fall-back Property (MFP) will be the one serious investment most preppers will not have made.

So today, we run through the basics.  Oh, and you’re welcome to come with Robin Landry and me (and our wives) on a cruise.  Details for Peoplenomics subscribers only!

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Prepper Deluxe: Time to Get a "Cache Property?" — 6 Comments

  1. Hi George
    Have always enjoyed your insights and those of Robin.
    Your readers and your self may not be aware that Australia has some real attractive rural property at pretty cheap prices .
    All the media focus is on Melbourne and Sydney our two major centres but Aus is as big as the US lower 48.
    Good soil, high rainfall AND internet and Cable. No pollution either. With the net business can be carried out any where.

  2. George ,
    I’ve been reading your site for the last 7 years and really enjoy your insight.

    Thank you and keep up the good work.


  3. It’s a pity the SkyWater company is determined to be coy on the price of its products. I don’t need to produce 900 gallons a day, but the stand alone house unit seems attractive, if priced somewhere south of what I’m currently paying for bottled. Thanks for the lead, though. Perhaps there are other companies out there to be discovered with similar types of units.

  4. “But, with word that the Feds were investigating to two perps shot and killed outside the Texas cartoon gathering, we have to ask what the point of the investigation was and why wasn’t it prevented? ”

    Uh…. Are you saying we should toss out the 4th Amendment and taxpayers should foot the bill for 24-hour surveillance on anyone who buys guns and posts things on the internet that are critical of our country? Those two things are the most common factors among those who commit domestic acts of terror.

  5. We Baby Boomers were the ones that were “had”. What interest rate were you charged for your mortgage, 7%? 9%? 11%? Now you can get one for half that. Cheated out of retirement pensions, lack of job stability, overcharged for credit cards, telephone, clothing, etc. Strontium 90 in our milk, diseases in some vaccines we were given, forced into wars that made no sense and exposed to pesticides. At least the Millenials are smarter than we were. They are not buying into the typical suburban slave model.

    • On the same ‘babyboomer’ theme, I want to disabuse people that think that we had the golden age of childhood. As children of the ‘greatest generation’ we were born into families that were greatly disrupted by WWII/Korea. Greatly damaged fathers, uncles, mothers and aunts who were trying to restore ‘normal’ in their own lives with untreated PTSD, grief from unreturned family, and complete dislocation. They dealt with the poverty many of their families experienced in the great depression by overindulging and overexpecting from their own kids.
      We were ‘faces in a crowd’ at our own dinner tables, double shifted at schools, went home to mothers that couldn’t figure out how they had lost their jobs and personal freedom while they were sold the ‘house in the suburbs’ and TV dinners, while emotionally closed off fathers hid behind newspapers and tried not to think of what happened in the war, or adopted do it yourself projects to be constantly busy.
      People have forgotten how bad the depression and the war really were, how it marked the kids that grew up then, how bad the details of it all impact us even now. Materially, we may have been better off than all previous generations. But we sprang from a time of dislocations, and our ‘normal’ wasn’t so normal.