Coping: With Dreams, Dream Work, and the Dream Center

Once again, the mind of George was busy delivering either the future or a frappe of leftover thought stubs last night as I had one of those odd dreams with content that has – on occasion – old me about the future before it arrives.

I won’t go through the litany of past experience – I’ve done that enough in the past – but the dream last night centered on the concept “The Sudberry (Sudbury) Incident” which would be fine.  Except, of course, I know no Sudberrys and have no idea why it should pop up in a dream. 

The word Sudberry (possibly Sundberry or Sudbury) doesn’t mean jack to me and it’s not a word that has cropped up in the previous conscious thought in the past year.  Hell, I don’t consciously remember ever thinking about it.

The problem with this kind of dream (with no apparent cause) is that it may be part of the greater subject area known as dream work.  This is where dreams are seen (almost shamanistically) as tools to help the conscious and unconscious/preconscious parts of the Whole Self have discourse.  Helps to have guidance.

The follow-up work on Sudberry/Sudbury incident, for me, is to wonder if there is a military aspect to it, since my retired SF/Ranger bro-in-law made an appearance in the dream.  Has me wondering about hostages, and unpleasantries down that road because he was a Delta nominee who was cut (glasses) because uncorrected vision was a requirement.

I’ve also sent a note to Grady up at the www.nostracodeus.com project to add the words to our web-scanning efforts.

So where is Sudbury/Sudbury?

Massachusetts:  City of 18,000 roughly

Massachusetts 2: A school in Framingham.

Ontario:  Greater Sudbury

Britain: A place in Suffolk, also historical area of London

Australia, reef in Queensland

I’m sure there are others, but whatever the hell “the Sudberry Incident” is will likely either pop into headlines in no more than 10-days, or this was just a leftover piece of brain-cheese that somehow ended up in a fight/conflict with aspects of military.  I’ll ask Panama, when he gets up and about, whether Sudberry is meaningful to him, and report back tomorrow.

And this gets us to the whole reason for this discussion in the first place:  I have had enough personal experiences – about a dozen so far – in which aspects of the future have shown up that I started a project back in 2008 called the National Dream Center.

I also believe I mentioned a while back that I wanted to divest myself of the site so that the important work of the site could continue.  Which was (and is) a kind of central repository where dreams about the future could be posted and results tracked.

My problem – is that as much as I loved the research, especially the charts over time showing how people’s dream content was drifting about, I just didn’t have time to devote to the daily postings that growing the site would entail.

And the idea was,; I think you’ll agree, just too damn good to drop.

So today, the www.nationaldreamcenter.com site is under the control of Chris McCleary who is a professional working in what?  Dream work!  Perfect!

You can read his bio and introduction first post over here.  And whether you have an oddity to post, please post it to Chris’s Dream Center DreamBase because the idea is to capture as much content as possible and try to and develop tools for working in this really odd land.

Oh, and my Consigliere called from Aspen over the weekend (life’s tough, huh?) whining about his broken foot was still not back into skiing condition, but then he warmed up to his subject.

“I don’t know if you noticed, but there is a post over on the Godlike Productions site about an earthquake warning for Wyoming for this week…which is kind of odd. You might want to take a look at it…

I did – the posts are over here.

Say, you don’t think the Sundby Reservoir southeast of Medicine Bow Peak got garbled up in my dream, do you?  We’ll just start the clock and wait, I suppose.

The only news item close is the death yesterday of a worker at a smelter in Sudbury, Canada… I don’t think that was it, but who knows?  A prequel?

Letters We Like to Get

This weekend’s Peoplenomics report deals with how to write a good “Dead Letter.”  In today’s digital age, a simple note to an executor of a will is NOT enough.  What about all those passwords and intellectual assets that will be under digital lock and key?  And would your survivors know where your online assets are even stashed?

George,
Very mature, well presented Peoplenomics report today.
Takes the organized life and closes the door softly.
Since I attend the local monthly meeting with speakers who
have had near death experiences, and I know a couple of
counselors who have had their own experiences and they
worked with hundreds of people with NDE experiences,
writing an instructional letter to finish up the unfinished
business of life…as you have done…seems practical.
…and when you get to the other side, evaluating your own
checklist of what did I get right and what still needs to be
done or corrected next life will be a wonderful
experience for you. And the fact that you shared
it with all of us earns you a…
“WELL DONE GEORGE!!!”
My regards,
Roger

Another subscriber – an attorney who specialized in wills and estate planning, seconded the concept and cited from personal experience:

My beloved client fighter jockey had a 3 ring notebook he called his “Croak Book”. It contained copies of insurance, wills, powers of attorney, brokerage accounts, bank accounts, treasure maps, and so forth. Key original documents were in a safe for obvious reasons.

When he died, we opened the Croak Book and everything was easy peasy. Except the World was never quite as much fun, in some ways, after he croaked. I truly look forward to seeing him again sometime, somewhere. And I always tell my clients about the croak book concept.

BUT. I also suggest that they write a personal letter to every loved one and seal it up to be given to them at death. The positive feedback from doing this since the ’80s is overwhelming. I have had several new millionaires (due to inheritance) tell me the personal note from Mom or Dad was far more important to them than the money. They realized the note was at my suggestion, and in some cases, they said it was the only really personal letter they ever got from that parent. It was always the most important letter they got from them. Tangible, touched by the hands of the departed, made with love. Such things cost only a few cents to make, but they are treasures beyond price. If you doubt me, go watch Field of Dreams again.

The Peoplenomics report was not just theoretical.  It’s a whole work plan for “shutting down George” after the last column.  (No, I’m in perfect health, but I like to have life planned out 20+ years in advance, thank you.)

I did find my Scottish genes kicking in as I started to write…

Dear Kids,  I spent all of your inheritance…but we had a marvelous time, thank you….and isn’t that the point?

No, I didn’t…but it was fun to write…and it was a good a mood-setter.  So much so, that I still haven’t written a word.  There’s gotta be a middle-ground in there somewhere.

Monday in the WoWW

Some follow-up:  Remember last week we were discussing that Labrador walking with the lady through the field of hay stubble who dropped the ball which hasn’t been found since?  I wondered about the weather since “clouds” fit some often into mystical events:

Both instances happened in the evening, about 7pm for the ball and 6:15 for the screw, Pacific time.  The weather on the day we lost the ball was mostly cloudy, the weather for the screw was partly cloudy with rain rolling in after dark (about 8pm).

And so – this is a key thing to do if you ever have one of the woo-woo disappearing things happen:  The very instant it does, get our your smartphone if you have one and photograph EVERYTHING.  Do a series of 360-degrees and then shoot everything in the sky as well.

Later on, when you have time, you can run the photo through Corel Photo Paint, or Photoshop, or whatever your fave pix editor is, and see what’s out there on the optical fringe of things…

The Anti-Gravity Research Project

I’m slowly building a library of anti-gravity books.

I have been considering this for a long time, but actually got to some research this weekend. 

The idea is simple:  While there have been huge numbers of words written about anti-gravity, the core concepts are actually quite limited.

For example, I have yet to find a solid piece of work on the Philadelphia Experiment prior to the Charles Berlitz book.  Tons of material since, but virtually nothing before.

So yeah, books like Brotherhood of the (Nazi) Bell,  are great stories, but I’m rereading things with an eye toward recovering data, not suppositions.

And this keeps going back to earlier and earlier times.  My buddy Vince is thinking that those disks on angled devices may have been rotating magnets, or something, that lifted things.  Yet, our spinning of high powered magnets in the metal lathe out in the shop hasn’t resulted in any anomalous effects yet, though our efforts there will continue…we have a whole his of angles and concepts to counter-rotate at high speed, including both axial and diametric rare earth rod magnets.

So far, the main discovery, is that magnets are expensive… contributions to the research are welcome if you have theories.  I couldn’t get any results off the Aquino approach…although my initial tests were with a conventional fluorescent light. 

Our next run through this will be using some old 866-A mercury vapor rectifier tubes which, in plasma state do rectify electricity (converting AC to pulsed DC).  Perhaps there’s something to it, but then comes the instrumentation issues of working around high voltage and trying to isolate the high voltage static effects (Biefield-Brown work) from the claimed reductions.

Or, I’ll just stick to solving client business problems and push this one back into the next lifetime when I’ll have more time available, presumably…

OK, off to collect financial headlines before the Wall St. Casino rings the dollar-Pavlov bell…

Write when you break even…

George   george@ure.net

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